100 Years: The Historical Legacy of The Beaver

With the October-November 2020 issue of Canada’s History, we are beginning a new chapter for Canada’s second-oldest still-published magazine. The Beaver returns in a new incarnation that honours the past while offering a platform for Indigenous voices.

Posted September 22, 2020

One hundred years of history. A century of storytelling. In October 2020, Canada’s History-The Beaver magazine will mark its 100th year of publication with a special collector’s issue showcasing a century’s worth of stories and photographs from the magazine’s vast archival collection.

At the same time, the special issue will examine The Beaver’s complicated legacy of colonialism when it comes to its historical portrayal of Indigenous peoples.

“With this special issue, we have worked with Indigenous writers and historians to share important new perspectives on the legacy of The Beaver,” said Canada’s History magazine Editor-in-Chief Mark Collin Reid. “In the early decades of The Beaver, Indigenous peoples were too often pushed to the margins of the magazine. The Beaver offered a window on the North — but one that was skewed by the lens of colonialism. With this special issue, we have worked to bring Indigenous stories to the fore.”

With the 100th-anniversary issue, Canada’s History Society hopes to encourage important conversations about the historical depictions of Indigenous peoples both in general and within the pages of The Beaver.

The special issue also marks an important milestone for The Beaver, which was “retired” as a brand in 2010. Beginning in October 2021, Canada’s History Society will relaunch The Beaver as an annual supplement to be published within Canada’s History magazine. The supplement edition of The Beaver will feature Indigenous stories and storytellers and explore the history of the North and the fur trade-era through an Indigenous lens.

The 100th-anniversary issue features articles and images that explore the cultures and traditions of Indigenous peoples; showcase the historical diversity of northern wildlife and landscapes; and illustrate the profound societal changes that occurred in the region in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

A century with The Beaver

Reframing the North

As we mark the magazine’s centennial, we reflect on the past, but we also want to share our aspirations for the future of Canada’s History.

The Names and Knowledge Initiative

How the Names and Knowledge Initiative is helping to reveal Indigenous peoples, places, and understandings in the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives.

Karine Duhamel Speaks about Life on the Land

“As an Indigenous person, I am looking at the pictures in The Beaver differently. I am looking at the things that make Indigenous peoples and communities strong...”

Our Promise to Future Generations

Facing the past is not always easy. As we mark our twenty-sixth year as an organization, Canada’s History Society is reflecting on its own history.

Teaching with The Beaver

We know that the legacy of The Beaver is complicated, sometimes even problematic. However, we also know that within the pages of the magazine there is great potential to encourage new questions and perspectives in sharing history with future generations.

All-time Greatest Covers

Our poll reveals readers’ favourite covers from The Beaver and Canada’s History.

The Write Stuff

From public-relations experts to romance novelists and news reporters, the people who helmed The Beaver left their marks on the magazine.

Northern Exposures

Who created The Beaver’s immense photographic collection?

Beaver Bites

Quirky, funny, and odd moments from the early issues of The Beaver.

'Devilish' Instruments

The Beaver was both fascinated and frustrated by new technologies.

Aiming for Perfection

The Beaver has used its pages to get the most out of its people.

October-November 2020

Marking a century of The Beaver. See what’s available in the October-November 2020 issue of Canada’s History.

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