Lost Heroes of Comic Book History

Canada’s History caught up with comic book historian Hope Nicholson, who along with partner Rachel Richey, is spearheading the drive to introduce Nelvana to a new generation of readers.

Written by Mark Collin Reid

January 20, 2014

A new documentary about Canada’s comic book legacy has been getting a lot of attention lately.

Entitled Lost Heroes: The Untold Story of Canadian Superheroes, the full-length film documents the history of Canadian comic book heros from the 1940s onward.

The film debuted at Toronto’s Royal Cinema on February 28, 2014, and was shown in Winnipeg and Seattle. It aired on Super Channel beginning March 4, 2014. You can read the reviews on IMDb.com

A comic book featuring Nelvana of the Northern Lights was made available as a digital download.

Nelvana was one of Canada’s first comic super heroines. She soared through the Arctic skies fighting for truth, justice, and the Canadian way.

Thanks to a highly successful online fundraising campaign, a pair of comic book aficionados has raised more than $50,000 to have the original Nelvana comics published in a single graphic novel format. The publication will go to print in the spring.

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Kick-starting Nelvana

Funding campaign helps comic book heroine rise from obscurity.

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An article called “Kick-starting Nelvana” appeared in the February-March 2014 issue of Canada’s History.

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