Cathédrale Saint-Germain

The Cathédrale Saint-Germain in Rimouski, Quebec, is on the 2017 Top 10 Endangered Places List. 

Created by the National Trust for Canad

June 8, 2017

Location 

Rimouski, Quebec

Why it matters

Built between 1854 and 1862, the Saint-Germain Cathedral was designed by the prominent French Canadian architect, Victor Bourgeau. Today, owned by the Fabrique Saint-Germain, the cathedral is home to one of the largest pipe organs in the province of Québec, a neo-classic tabernacle built by François-Thomas Baillargé in 1833, as well as a painting of Saint Germain d’Auxerre dating back to 1740. The cathedral is also adorned with historic goldsmithing items, works of art, and stained glass windows. To this day, it is the tallest building in Rimouski.

Why it’s endangered 

In 2014, the Fabrique Saint-Germain was forced to close the building to the public due to safety concerns. Since that time, the cathedral has remained unoccupied, causing the building’s deterioration to accelerate. Public consultations are expected to occur in 2017 to determine viable options for the cathedral’s future – but once a decision has been reached, it could take years to implement.

Today, the estimated cost to repair the exterior of the cathedral would be a minimum of $5 million, and over $20 million to repair the entire building. 

Every year, the National Trust publishes its Top 10 Endangered Places List as part of its mission to raise awareness of the value that historic places bring to quality of life, local identity and cultural vitality.

First published in 2005, the Top 10 Endangered Places List has become a powerful tool in the fight to make landmarks, not landfill. The National Trust believes that historic places are cornerstones of identity, community and sense of place, yet every year, more are lost due to neglect, lack of funding, inappropriate development and weak legislation. By shining a spotlight on places at risk, the Top 10 Endangered Places List raises awareness about their plight and bolsters the efforts of local advocates working to save them.

Skip social share links

Related to Historic Sites