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2014 Recipients

The 2014 recipients are announced!

David Alexander and Ryan McManaman: Recipients of the 2014 Governor General's History Award for Excellence in Teaching

David Alexander & Ryan McManaman

Recipients of the 2014 Governor General's History Award for Excellence in Teaching

Michael Berry: 2014 recipient of the Governor General's History Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Michael Berry

2014 recipient of the Governor General's History Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Connie Wyatt Anderson: 2014 recipient of Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Connie Wyatt Anderson

2014 recipient of Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Gérald Charron: 2014 recipient of the Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Gérald Charron

2014 recipient of the Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Laurie Cassie & Sharon Moy: 2014 recipients of the Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Laurie Cassie & Sharon Moy

2014 recipients of the Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Manon St-Hilaire: 2014 recipient of Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Manon St-Hilaire

2014 recipient of Governor General’s History Awards for Excellence in Teaching.

Governor General's Award for Excellence in Teaching

Congratulations to the 2014 recipients!

Click here to find out more about this year's winners.

 

 

"History in their Hands: Creating Young Historians Through Archaeology" developed out of a grade twelve native studies and archaeology credit which Cathy has taught since 1996.

The students’ assignment was to design a mock interview based on real events faced by an immigrant arriving in Canada at the turn of the twentieth century. The goal of the work was to better understand the experiences, challenges, and hopes of new arrivals to the country.

Matt Henderson's students began their early investigation into the Idle No More movement by looking at some of the contemporary pieces of legislation, like the Indian Act, in order to come to grips with what Indigenous people were up against. They began building a knowledge base of the Idle No More movement. Matt's blog was used as a forum to post videos, news articles, and interviews performed with First Nations leaders. From there, teachers and students from all over Canada began to add to the resources and comment on what they learned or thought of the movement itself.

The CDDHS/DCMA Battlefields Project may be one of the only formal partnerships between a school and municipal Museum & Archives in Canada. The students selected for this project work cooperatively with the Archivists at the DCMA and the teaching staff at Centre Dufferin DHS in Shelburne, Ontario, conducting research which is both digital/on-line, as well as primary and oral history.

Rachel's project is a complete integration of historical thinking into the Grade 10 Canadian History course, grounded by three anchor projects/units: the course overview unit, the Glebe World War II soldier memorial and the final summative interview in lieu of a written exam.

Romy and Graeme have revitalized the Heritage Fair at their school by designing it with a critical thinking question as the focus and teaching it as a history study rather than a social studies project, embedding historical thinking concepts into each step.




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