Moose Jaw Natatorium

The Moose Jaw Natatorium in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, is on the 2018 Top 10 Endangered Places List.

Created by the National Trust for Canada

May 23, 2018

Location

Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

Why it matters

For decades, this iconic Depression-era swimming facility was a social hub for the residents of Moose Jaw, hosting dances and weddings, and was the training pool for Moose Jaw’s first Olympian, Phyllis Dewar. Originally fed by a nearby mineral hot spring when it opened in 1932, the facility continues to be a major component of the civic facilities in the centrally located Crescent Park.

Why it’s endangered

Despite recent investments from all levels of government to update the change rooms and to repair the adjacent outside pool, the Natatorium’s indoor pool has been abandoned for 20 years. Calls for private sector partnerships have been unsuccessful, and while municipal officials struggle to find a sustainable vision, the potential for demolition threatens this community landmark.

Every year, the National Trust publishes its Top 10 Endangered Places List as part of its mission to raise awareness of the value that historic places bring to quality of life, local identity and cultural vitality.

First published in 2005, the Top 10 Endangered Places List has become a powerful tool in the fight to make landmarks, not landfill. The National Trust believes that historic places are cornerstones of identity, community and sense of place, yet every year, more are lost due to neglect, lack of funding, inappropriate development and weak legislation. By shining a spotlight on places at risk, the Top 10 Endangered Places List raises awareness about their plight and bolsters the efforts of local advocates working to save them.

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