2018 Recipient of the Governor General’s History Award for Scholarly Research Announced

Elsbeth Heaman wins top prize for academic writing in Canadian history for her book Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867–1917. 

May 29, 2018

The Canadian Historical Association (CHA) has announced their 2018 prize winners including the recipient of the Governor General’s History Award for Scholarly Research: The Sir John A. Macdonald Prize.

This year the honour will be presented to Elsbeth Heaman for her work Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867–1917 published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2017. Dr. Heaman is a professor in the Department of History at McGill University in Montreal. 

Her award winning book “explores tensions around the government of wealth and poverty from Confederation to the wartime income tax of 1917. Successive chapters explore the politics of fairness in successive debates around the meaning of region (in Nova Scotia), race (in British Columbia), poverty (in Montreal), wealth (in Toronto), land ownership (coast to coast), and the federal construction of citizenship more broadly. The book analyzes an episode of liberal, plutocratic rule, from its deep, constitutional causes in 1867 to its bitterly polarizing consequences in 1917.”

The award is presented annually by the Canadian Historical Association for the best academic Canadian history book. Heaman will receive her award at a special ceremony at Rideau Hall in the fall. The award is presented each year as part of the Governor General’s History Awards.

This year’s announcement ceremony took place in Regina as part of Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The book has also been selected as the 2018 Canada Prize winner by the Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences for "exceptional contribution to scholarship, are engagingly written, and enrich the social, cultural and intellectual life of Canada."

Four other academics were shortlisted for the Macdonald Prize:

The CHA announced the winner of its other major annual prize. Freedom’s Debtors: British Antislavery in Sierra Leone in the Age of Revolution by Padraic X. Scanlan won the Ferguson Prize for outstanding scholarly work in a field of history outside of Canadian history.

Numerous other awards were also handed out at the CHA ceremony, including:

Canadian Committee on Labor History

Best Article Prize

Winners: Lisa Pasolli & Julia Smith, “The Labor Relations of Love: Workers, Childcare, and the State in 1970s Vancouver, British Columbia,” Labor: Studies in Working-Class History, volume 14, issue 4.

Eugene A. ​Forsey Prize For Graduate Student Dissertation Prize

Winner: Julia Smith, “Union Organizing in the Canadian Banking Industry, 1940–1980” PhD Dissertation, Concordia University, 2016.

Canadian Committee on Migration, Ethnicity and Transnationalism Article Prize

Winners: Eric M. Adams & Jordan Strange-Ross, “The Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective, “Promises of Law: The Unlawful Dispossession of Japanese Canadians”, Osgoode Hall Law Journal, 54, no 3, 2017.

History of Children and Youth Group Prize

Winner: Mona Gleason, “Avoiding the Agency Trap: Caveats for Historians of Children, Youth, and Education”. Journal of the History of Education (Vol. 45, no. 4, 2016).

Canadian Committee on Women’s History — Hilda Neatby Prize

Winner of the French Language Article

Sophie Doucet, « Sur le chemin du paradis : les joies d’aimer, de croire et de s’accomplir de Marie-Louise Globensky (1849–1919) » Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française, Vol 70, no 3 (Hiver 2017).

Winner of the English Language Article

Meaghan Longstaffe, “Indigenous Women as Newspaper Representations: Violence and Action in 1960s Vancouver”. The Canadian Historical Review, 98, 2 (June 2017).

Winner of the Book Prize

Gail G. Campbell, “I Wish to Keep a Record”: Nineteenth-Century New Brunswick Women Diarists and Their World. University of Toronto Press, 2017.

Political History Group

Best English-Article Prize

Winners: Eric M. Adams & Jordan Stranger-Ross, « The Landscapes of Injustice Research Collective, “Promises of Law: The Unlawful Dispossession of Japanese Canadians” (Osgoode Hall Law Journal, 54, no. 3 2017).

Book Prize

Winner: Elsbeth Heaman, Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867–1917. McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017.

The Canadian Committee on the History of Sexuality

Best English-Article Prize

Winner: Mona Gleason, “‘Knowing Something I Was Not Meant to Know’: Exploring Vulnerability, Sexuality, and Childhood, 1900–1950” Canadian Historical Review 98, 1 (March 2017).

The Canadian Oral History Association

Winners: Kristina R. Llewellyn & Nicholas Ng-A-Fook, Oral History and Education: Theories, Dilemmas, and Practices. Palgrave-Macmillan, 2017.

Indigenous History Group Prizes

Best Article Prize

Winner: Micah A. Pawling, "Wəlastəkwey (Maliseet) Homeland: Waterscapes and Continuity within the Lower St. John River Valley, 1784–1900,” Acadiensis XLVI, no. 2 (summer/autumn 2017).

Book Prize

Winner: Susan M. Hill, The Clay We are Made Of: Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on the Grand River. University of Manitoba Press, 2017.

CHA PRIZES / Prix de la SHC

Prix Jean-Marie-Fecteau Prize

For best article published in a peer-reviewed journal by a PhD or Masters-level student in English or in French.

Winner / La lauréate : Julien Mauduit, « L’économie politique des patriotes, entre capitalisme et socialisme » Bulletin d’histoire politique, volume 25, numéro 2, hiver 2017, p. 172–192.

Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, issues #1 and #2 Best Article Prize

Winner: James Forbes. ““A Deplorable Speech”: The Liberal Party vs. Anti-Catholicism during the Alexander Mackenzie Administration, 1873–1878.”

John Bullen Prize

Honours the outstanding Ph.D. thesis on a historical topic submitted in a Canadian university by a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

Winner: Isabelle Bouchard, « Des systèmes politiques en quête de légitimité: terres « seigneuriales », pouvoirs et enjeux locaux dans les communautés autochtones de la vallée du Saint-Laurent ». Thèse. Montréal (Québec, Canada), Université du Québec à Montréal, Doctorat en histoire, 2017.

Clio Prizes

For meritorious publications or for exceptional contributions by individuals or organizations to regional history.

Atlantic Region

Winner: Jeffers Lennox, Homelands and Empires: Indigenous Spaces, Imperial Fictions, and Competition for Territory in Northeastern North America, 1690–1763. University of Toronto Press, 2017.

Québec

Winner: Matthew Barlow, Griffintown. Identity and Memory in an Irish Diaspora Neighbourhood. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2017.

Ontario

Winner: Susan M. Hill, The Clay We are Made Of: Haudenosaunee Land Tenure on the Grand River. University of Manitoba Press, 2017.

The Prairies

Winners: Erika Dyck and Alex Deighton. Managing Madness: Weyburn Mental Hospital and the Transformation of Psychiatric Care in Canada. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2017.

British Columbia

Winner: Lynne Marks. Infidels and the Damn Churches: Irreligion and Religion in Settler British Columbia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017.

The North

Winner: Joan Sangster. The Iconic North: Cultural Constructs of Aboriginal Life in Postwar Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2017.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Winner: Cole Harris

Wallace K. Ferguson Prize

Awarded to outstanding scholarly book in a field of history other than Canadian history.

Short list in alphabetical order

Winner: Padraic X. Scanlan, Freedom’s Debtors: British Antislavery in Sierra Leone in the Age of Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017.

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