Bryn Mawr

Bryn Mawr in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, is on the 2017 Top 10 Endangered Places List. 

Created by the National Trust for Canada

June 8, 2017

Location 

St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Why it matters

Built in 1907, Bryn Mawr (also known as Baird Cottage) was built by James Baird, a business man in St. John’s during the early 20th century. The cottage was built in the Queen Anne style, and was originally constructed as a summer home for the Baird family. In 1993, the residence was provincially designated by the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador; more recently, in 2016, the residence was municipally designated by the City of St. John’s.

Why it’s endangered 

Despite being protected by two levels of heritage designation, Bryn Mawr is still threatened with demolition.

The cottage narrowly avoided destruction last year, when residents rallied together to save the building. Public protests and a petition supporting the preservation of the building, garnering over 1,000 signatures, motivated the City to formally designate the heritage residence – without the owner’s consent. Interior features of the building, however, have been partially stripped.

As it stands, the current property owner of the residence is suing the City of St. John’s over the heritage designation. 

Every year, the National Trust publishes its Top 10 Endangered Places List as part of its mission to raise awareness of the value that historic places bring to quality of life, local identity and cultural vitality.

First published in 2005, the Top 10 Endangered Places List has become a powerful tool in the fight to make landmarks, not landfill. The National Trust believes that historic places are cornerstones of identity, community and sense of place, yet every year, more are lost due to neglect, lack of funding, inappropriate development and weak legislation. By shining a spotlight on places at risk, the Top 10 Endangered Places List raises awareness about their plight and bolsters the efforts of local advocates working to save them.

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