Project Showcase: Treaty4Project

In this presentation, Naomi Fortier-Fréçon and Calvin Racette discuss Treaty4Project.

November 21, 2017

This presentation is in French and English

In this presentation, Naomi Fortier-Fréçon and Calvin Racette discuss Treaty4Project. The principal aim of the Treaty4Project is for students to understand their generation’s relationship with Treaty 4 in Saskatchewan, both today and in the future. Through the participation of elders, Indigenous artists, university professors, activists, and education students, the project provides students with a chance to engage with community members and gain the fundamental knowledge they need to tackle very complex issues. 

This presentation by Naomi Fortier-Fréçon and Calvin Racette is part of the “Project Showcase” Panel at the 10th Canada’s History Forum, Making History Relevant that was held on November 21, 2017 at the Canadian Museum of History. This event was organized by Canada’s National History Society and the National Council on Public History.

Saskatchewan teachers Naomi Sara Fortier-Fréçon (Regina Public Schools) and Leia Laing (Conseil des écoles fransaskoises) are interested in the development of anti-oppressive and social justice teaching strategies that encourage students to develop a better understanding of the issues related to Indigenous culture and traditions. Naomi and Leia achieve this by encouraging their students’ linguistic development through interdisciplinary activities (French, visual art, music, humanities) adapted to their ages in accordance with the expectations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action.

Calvin Racette is Métis from the Qu’Appelle Valley in southern Saskatchewan. He recently retired after a thirty-four-year career in education. He served many roles during his career, the majority of which focused on Indigenous education. Calvin is recognized as a local historian and has many publications to his name. He most recently co-authored a K-8 compilation of fifty-four children’s books on treaty education.

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